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We share actionable advice about pain management, injury, strength training, exercise, rehab, and how to make healthcare work for you.

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The 5 Big Problems Facing Clients with Pain and Injury Who Want to Get Back to an Active Lifestyle
By defining the problem, you know where to start during rehab and developing an active lifestyle. Once you know your problem, you can focus on what needs to solve it.
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The 8 Reasons All HHP Clients Go Through a Movement Assessment
There is an entire area of research devoted to what behaviors keep people moving and what makes them stop. Keeping people active is not simple and there are numerous reasons why a person will stop. The purpose of the movement assessment is to figure out issues that will stop you from moving.
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7 Signs Your Heel Pain Is Not Coming From Your Plantar Fascia
As a general rule, you will be diagnosed with plantar fasciitis if you have heel pain. I have not seen a patient reporting heel pain that was diagnosed with anything other than plantar fasciitis for the last 5 years. This is not the only structure on the bottom of the foot that can cause pain.
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What are the 3 major issues in physical therapy and exercise?

The quality of physical therapy is not consistent between clinicians or clinics.  There are numerous reasons causing the differences: the overall rehab process, the management, how the client pays for the service (insurance, Medicare, cash, etc.), the time available between the clinician and patient, the use of assistants, the number of patients per provider during an hour, the clinical skill set, and training of a specific physical therapist. This is far from an exhaustive list.  These issues result in a pervasive underperformance in rehab outcomes for clients. The 3 major issues in physical therapy and rehab When starting out on a rehab journey, you will not think about these problems – you just want to feel better. But these issues matter and directly impact your

Read More »

The 5 Most Useful Tools for Progressing Your Workouts After an Injury

Too many fail in their effort to progress activity after an injury. You arrive at the gym feeling good but later in the day the low back soreness that has been feeling better comes back or the knee pain that seemed to be going away comes back with a vengeance after your second run.  The regression happened even when the workout felt easy and pain-free at the time. Why is this happening? Why is this phase of rehab frustrating?   It’s due to a fundamental mistake or what we call a violation of the rehab standard, which is training at exercise capacity, not tissue capacity. When individuals make this mistake, they start telling themselves stories like ‘I am getting too old,’ or ‘I guess I need

Read More »

The 7 Tissues to Consider When Progressing Activity After Physical Therapy

The Rehab Standard is an SPC concept that defines when a client has a higher exercise capacity than tissue capacity.   When your tissue capacity is lower than the exercise capacity, the focus of the workout is not how hard you worked out.  It is not how much you sweat or how good of a muscle burn you got. The focus is on the healing tissue and that is was not overloaded, irritated, or provoked.  A violation of the rehab standard can present as pain after the workout or the next day, even if there was no pain during the workout. The key is to focus on tissue capacity in the exercise selection, intensity, volume and the type of tissue injured. We want to look at

Read More »

The 5 Big Problems Facing Clients with Pain and Injury Who Want to Get Back to an Active Lifestyle

There are numerous problems facing people in living an active, healthy life, but it can be difficult to articulate the problem that needs to be solved. Let’s look at two people dealing with low back pain. One person bent over this morning to grab a pencil and now cannot stand up straight. The second person developed back pain years ago and stopped doing certain movements because of discomfort. The pain is still present daily and they use a combination of meds, massage, and chiropractic to keep big flares up away. Their problems are different despite both dealing with low back pain. The solutions are very different. The person who just hurt their back needs a diagnosis and a home plan targeting healing strategies and triggers.

Read More »

The Injury Types That Are Mismanaged During Activity Progression

The rehab standard is simple; the limit to your exercise is not how hard you can work out, but rather working as hard as possible without going past your tissue capacity.  Our team sees violation of the rehab standard as the most frequent cause of failure during activity progression. A client will feel great and start to progress their workouts. There is no symptoms during the exercise and often no symptoms the same day, but the next day they feel horrible.  We know that in activity progression, you need to understand the type of tissue that is healing, the specific exercise, and volume. We also need to consider the type of injury: chronic, recurrent, and acute.  Chronic Injury For chronic, we mean is has been

Read More »

7 Tools to overcome invisible triggers stalling your rehab progress

An invisible trigger is a problem that can stop you from fully healing. An invisible trigger is an action or activity that does not seem to be causing your injury to worsen but is actually causing your injury to remain and not heal properly. During the course of treatment, our team comes across this problem frequently when a patient will seem to stop progressing in their rehab plan. This problem presents most often during the symptom stabilization and the activity progression phases.  The physical therapist will see an improvement in symptoms during a session, but then progress is lost when the patient tries to manage the symptoms on their own. During activity progression, there is often an interaction between the activity being progressed and normal

Read More »

What are the 3 major issues in physical therapy and exercise?

The quality of physical therapy is not consistent between clinicians or clinics.  There are numerous reasons causing the differences: the overall rehab process, the management, how the client pays for the service (insurance, Medicare, cash, etc.), the time available between the clinician and patient, the use of assistants, the number of patients per provider during an hour, the clinical skill set, and training of a specific physical therapist. This is far from an exhaustive list.  These issues result in a pervasive underperformance in rehab outcomes for clients. The 3 major issues in physical therapy and rehab When starting out on a rehab journey, you will not think about these problems – you just want to feel better. But these issues matter and directly impact your

Read More »

The 5 Most Useful Tools for Progressing Your Workouts After an Injury

Too many fail in their effort to progress activity after an injury. You arrive at the gym feeling good but later in the day the low back soreness that has been feeling better comes back or the knee pain that seemed to be going away comes back with a vengeance after your second run.  The regression happened even when the workout felt easy and pain-free at the time. Why is this happening? Why is this phase of rehab frustrating?   It’s due to a fundamental mistake or what we call a violation of the rehab standard, which is training at exercise capacity, not tissue capacity. When individuals make this mistake, they start telling themselves stories like ‘I am getting too old,’ or ‘I guess I need

Read More »

The 7 Tissues to Consider When Progressing Activity After Physical Therapy

The Rehab Standard is an SPC concept that defines when a client has a higher exercise capacity than tissue capacity.   When your tissue capacity is lower than the exercise capacity, the focus of the workout is not how hard you worked out.  It is not how much you sweat or how good of a muscle burn you got. The focus is on the healing tissue and that is was not overloaded, irritated, or provoked.  A violation of the rehab standard can present as pain after the workout or the next day, even if there was no pain during the workout. The key is to focus on tissue capacity in the exercise selection, intensity, volume and the type of tissue injured. We want to look at

Read More »

The 5 Big Problems Facing Clients with Pain and Injury Who Want to Get Back to an Active Lifestyle

There are numerous problems facing people in living an active, healthy life, but it can be difficult to articulate the problem that needs to be solved. Let’s look at two people dealing with low back pain. One person bent over this morning to grab a pencil and now cannot stand up straight. The second person developed back pain years ago and stopped doing certain movements because of discomfort. The pain is still present daily and they use a combination of meds, massage, and chiropractic to keep big flares up away. Their problems are different despite both dealing with low back pain. The solutions are very different. The person who just hurt their back needs a diagnosis and a home plan targeting healing strategies and triggers.

Read More »

The Injury Types That Are Mismanaged During Activity Progression

The rehab standard is simple; the limit to your exercise is not how hard you can work out, but rather working as hard as possible without going past your tissue capacity.  Our team sees violation of the rehab standard as the most frequent cause of failure during activity progression. A client will feel great and start to progress their workouts. There is no symptoms during the exercise and often no symptoms the same day, but the next day they feel horrible.  We know that in activity progression, you need to understand the type of tissue that is healing, the specific exercise, and volume. We also need to consider the type of injury: chronic, recurrent, and acute.  Chronic Injury For chronic, we mean is has been

Read More »

7 Tools to overcome invisible triggers stalling your rehab progress

An invisible trigger is a problem that can stop you from fully healing. An invisible trigger is an action or activity that does not seem to be causing your injury to worsen but is actually causing your injury to remain and not heal properly. During the course of treatment, our team comes across this problem frequently when a patient will seem to stop progressing in their rehab plan. This problem presents most often during the symptom stabilization and the activity progression phases.  The physical therapist will see an improvement in symptoms during a session, but then progress is lost when the patient tries to manage the symptoms on their own. During activity progression, there is often an interaction between the activity being progressed and normal

Read More »